Sheriff Alex Villanueva

De-Coding the Case Files of Rehired LA Sheriff’s Deputy Carl Mandoyan: Part 1 – Command & Control

Celeste Fremon
Written by Celeste Fremon

The past two weeks have been active ones in the unendingly controversial case of Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Deputy Caren Carl Mandoyan, the deputy fired by the LASD in 2016 under former Sheriff Jim McDonnell, who was was rehired early this year by Sheriff Alex Villanueva.

Much of the controversy has pertained to the fact that Mandoyan was fired for alleged domestic abuse, along with reported stalking and bullying behavior against his ex-girlfriend, who was also a deputy at the time.

Mandoyan then allegedly lied about these actions to the department’s Internal Affairs Bureau, which is in itself cause for termination from the LASD.

In 2017, the notoriously deputy-friendly Civil Service Commission upheld the LASD’s firing of Mandoyan.

Last Tuesday, Sheriff Villanueva told members of the county’s Civilian Oversight Commission when they questioned him—yet again—on the Mandoyan matter, that there was exculpatory evidence, which had been excluded from the Civil Service Commission hearing.  This evidence, he said, demonstrated the false nature of the department’s Internal Affairs investigation against Mandoyan.

Villanueva referred to a memo that Mandoyan wrote to his supervisor regarding a phone call that his former girlfriend —-whom we’ll call Deputy X—made to him, during which she used a lot of swear words, and threatened to report him for his alleged actions, if he didn’t back off with his alleged stalking of her.

Villanueva seemed to suggest the memo had been deliberately ignored by the investigation, thus demonstrating the false nature of the department’s Internal Affairs investigation of Mandoyan.

(For the record, a memo written by Mandoyan to his then Lieutenant about a June 2015 angry and threatening phone call from Deputy X is discussed at length in several instances during the Civil Service Commission hearings. As to whether it is exculpatory or not is in the eye of the beholder.)

The next day, at a Wednesday morning press conference he again talked about exculpatory evidence that was left out, and told reporters that there was no evidence whatsoever of the purported domestic assault.

A few days later still, a cluster of news outlets—WitnessLA among them—used California Public Records Act requests to acquire the Civil Service Commission files for the Mandoyan case.

The files  include 1978 pages of text, plus nine home videos, some of them very short, which show Mandoyan appearing to try to break into the home of Deputy X, a former deputy who also worked for the department at the time of the allegations. Two of the videos show Mandoyan as he appears to attempt to some how get a sliding glass patio door open or off its track. Two other videos show little more than shadows, as they are taken in the wee hours, but allegedly feature the sound of Deputy X catching Mandoyan trying again to break into her apartment, this time via the bathroom window, while she repeatedly yells at him to leave.

ABC7 News, followed by the LA Times and others, released two of the videos. (We’ve posted three of them here.)

Then after the splash of the video release, NBC4, and ABC7 interviewed Mr. Mandoyan himself who, up until then had been dodging the press.

In his interviews, Mandoyan described the hell he had been through with this controversy over his rehiring. He went on to describe two ex-girlfriends, one of them Deputy X, who got together and conspired to put a completely false case on him that cost him his job.

Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Deputy Lisa Richardson also told Eyewitness News that Deputy X told her that she had never been hit or pushed by Mandoyan. Mandoyan’s camp further said that
an interview with Richardson was somehow lost, possibly deliberately,  by Internal Affairs investigators.

The nearly 2000 pages of Civil Service Commission files have their own very long and detailed  narrative of the Mandoyan/Deputy X drama that, in certain ways is a weave of contradictions.  Yet it gradually  tells a story,  which we’ll explore in several chapters.


Control issues

Two of the three best known incidents related to the Mandoyan case, are the two alleged attempted break-ins to Deputy X’s apartment, which she recorded at least partially on video, in December 2014, and January 2015.

The third, of course,  is the alleged assault.

Yet the bulk of the Civil Service Commission’s case files are not about those three allegations. Instead they are a series of snapshots of what Deputy X portrayed as a mutually toxic relationship that started out well when the two began dating in December 2012, when they were both working a the LASD’s West Hollywood station.

But, by February 2014, when she and Mandoyan were no longer working together, as he had transferred to the South Los Angeles patrol station,  things turned another direction, according to Deputy X. She  began to feel Mandoyan was trying “to control and isolate her,” she said in her lengthy testimony, and subsequent cross-examination (in between which, she resigned from the department altogether).

As she described it, Deputy Mandoyan, a well liked training officer with a good reputation at work, became a hyper-controlling, jealous, and bullying boyfriend who told her not to talk to people at work, that they disliked her, and couldn’t be trusted.

He also, according to Deputy X, badgered her not to show up for the required pre-shift briefings. Many times—she told the Civil Service Commission–she complied.

that she not respond to calls with her partners; that she not talk or smile to other men.

Mandoyan allegedly call Deputy X repeatedly while she was working, demanding to know where she was and who she was with. When she socialized separately with family or friends, he would show up uninvited, she testified.

Another form of control, according to Deputy X, was when Mandoyan grabbed her phone and deleted texts,  recordings, and even contact information in her phone’s address book.  It got the point that she began texting or emailing anything she wanted to safeguard to her female cousin, who was also a witness at the Civil Service Commission hearing.

“He would go through her phone, looking through her call logs to see who she was speaking to, [then] would delete things if he didn’t like them…” the cousin testified.

“She wanted to try and make a peaceful exit out of the relationship and not” said the cousin, open Pandora’s Box, as she would put.

“She felt unsafe. Her job was being threatened. He was making threats to her.”

Deputy X’s cousin also said that Mandoyan complained to her personally, when she was visiting Deputy X, at which time Mandoyan would inevitably show up.

“He would just bash her character, about the type of person she is,” the cousin testified, “referring to her as a whore, sleeping with men on the job, sleeping with married men.” He said a buddy told him these things, according to the cousin.

As a further method of control, according to Deputy X, Mandoyan allegedly threatened repeatedly to destroy her reputation and career in the department, along with that of her father, who also reportedly also worked at the LASD at the time.

As an element of his threats, Deputy X testified, Mandoyan referred to the fact that he is a tattoo wearing member of  the deputy clique, “The Grim Reapers.” (The LA Times Maya Lau originally broke the Grim Reapers part of the story.)

He would repeatedly remind her, she said, that he had a long reach, because he  knew “people in high places on the department,” which she believed was a reference to Reapers and others, with whom he was close.

Because of the status and influence she believed Mandoyan to have, Deputy X said she wanted to keep their relationship amicable, even long after she had become disenchanted.  It was important to her that they remain on good terms, she said.

There were witnesses to some of the alleged attempts to bully or control her, including some women friends, one of her supervisors, then a sergeant, now a lieutenant, the female cousin of Deputy X, her radio car partner, and others.

All this, according to Deputy X, was before things really got bad.

Of course, none of this proves that Carol Mandoyan wasn’t set up by Deputy X and others.

We are simply giving you puzzle pieces.  With many more still to come.

To be continued


The two videos above are from the Civil Service Commission Case File of rehired LASD deputy Caren Carl Mandoyan. In these videos, which depict a sequence, Deputy Mandoyan has allegedly broken into the apartment of his estranged girlfriend, Deputy X, via the bathroom window, after heading to her home just before he thought she would be getting off work. He allegedly did so, surreptitiously, not knowing that she had left her shift early, around 3:30 a.m. instead of 4 a.m. when it actually ended. Halfway through the first video, Deputy X  hears noises so tiptoes to the bathroom door and flings it open, allegedly catching Mandoyan in the act of breaking in. In video two, she is still trying to get him out, as the audio portion of the video makes clear. When Mandoyan repeatedly asks Deputy X, “Where’re you going to find one?” he is reportedly referring to an earlier conversation in which she told him she wants to find a non-toxic relationship, or words to that general effect.


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83 Comments

  • The county Way is to say that individuals lied during an investigation, but these videos are very concerning in this specific case. Not judging, But AV there are many out there sitting n waiting for their chance to be heard and return to work with much less against them.

    • Celeste, I meant the number of arrests and investigations on her own, not counting the ones she may have made while in her six months of training, as directed by her Field Training Officer. I don’t mean to put Christine on blast, but she did about 10 years at the Men’s Central Jail, in the hospital wing, working the graveyard shift. She then transferred to San Dimas Station, where she patrolled the mean streets of San Dimastone. From there she promoted to sergeant and did her thing at Lakewood? Anyone who knows better? And then she went to IAB, figures.

      It would be my opinion, that assignments at IAB and ICIB, should only be given to people who have actually worked the field, in all aspects, of it, for at least 10 years. They need to be solid, as they will have the power to destroy a deputies life and the lives of all those close to that deputy under investigation. Having no experience as to what constitutes a crime, is a disservice to the entire organization.

      My two cents…

    • Hate to burst your hate bubble, but settlements before and/or during Civil Service appeals are pretty standard fare. It’s well within the purview of any county department to do so.

      Good try though, WLA, et.al.

      • 100% accurate !! BOS and the press love to slam cops and the new sheriff because he’s not kissing their rear ends.

  • WLA is many many things….but a news outlet you are not. Please don’t confuse yourself further. It scares the kids.

  • Celeste, I think we’re all done with this Mandoyan case and have moved on. As should you. Is the media this desperate that you’ve been dwelling over a 4 year old case for the last 3 months? You act like this is the Baca/Tanaka trial.

    OK, we get it, there were allegations, toxic relationship that ended bad, then involved a second ex, etc…. Move on to something else. It’s really getting boring.

    Then you end it with, to be continued? Please don’t. Save us from any more stupidity from this case.

  • If Carl has a case and feels strong about it, he should sued the County of Los Angeles in Superior Court for wrongful termination. The donations he and his family made to both the Lindsey and AV campaigns don’t look good either unfortunately.

  • I know the editor has the ultimate decision to report what they want, how they want and to shape/spin the story to their own design but their’s been some major news stories going on in the state.

    What about Governor Newsome over turning the death penalty or should I say abolishing the death penalty in the state with the stroke of his pen by executive very decisciin. Of course this was against the will of the voters. Why even vote?

    What about Governor Newsome and the Central valley high speed rail pork project the state doesn’t need and the people don’t want?

    What about the judges ruling in high capacity gun magazines.

    This is big stuff but probably not something in line with editor’s political leaning I would gather. Telling though.

  • Can you link the documents that were released by the county. Everyone talks about it but I can’t find the PDF

  • Move On; The LASD is all that Celeste and her WLA (So called news outlet) has. Look at the attention her other articles get. Usually zero, sometimes 1 or 2 comments. Maybe 10 to 15 people around LA read them.

    She got lucky that Banaka handed every news outlet a shitshow on a Silver Planter. My 10 year old could have covered that. And now she’s praying for the next scandal. She’s hanging her hat on Carl right now, that’s for sure.

    Pretty pathetic actually.

  • Theres one thing I’ve noticed about these videos coming out against this Deputy. They labeled him and made him sound like an aggressive violent man, yet everytime in these videos of him, hes very calm and not raising his voice. Usually, someone that is aggressive or violent would be yelling. This deputy is not.

  • It’s funny that you’re stuck like glue to the LASD. I bet you’re a Democrat/Socialist who thinks Feinstein, Harris and Hillary are the best.
    Find something newsworthy like how California robs other funds to pay illegal aliens or why we, especially in California, NEED the border WALL or why the former Governor Jerry Moonbeam decided Calif. should be a sanctuary state breaking Federal Law.

  • I am sure one of the learned officers on this site will correct me, but isn’t it a crime to try to break into someone’s home? Do you really want these unstable people on the force? Should he not be prosecuted? Anywhere else this would not be a discussion. They would have been fired, end of story. But, they are on the government dime and have a sense of entitlement. Let’s see how much Walmart tolerates when he is working security over there.

    And, I love these fine folks that complain about Celeste’s writing and how no one is reading it, but, alas, they are reading it and commenting on it. No matter how much they whine about the absence of stories about “illegal immigrants” and Newson’s action on the death penalty, or whatever has them pissed off this day, they will keep on reading, getting angry and attacking Celeste. I guess it gives their lives meaning.

    • @CF, DATED 04/04/19….technically yes. However, the crime of burglary is with the intent to enter and commit a felony. This was not the case. Mandoyan was trying to gain access to his place of dwelling. Further, his keys were within the structure. His ex-girlfriend refused to let him in. Furthermore, your ludicrous statement, of being on the government dime is pathetic. Remember, that government dime comes out of the taxes police officers pay. Moreover, the reference to WLA’s (Celeste) writing about the LASD garners more attention & bias than any other article. Based on your closing comments, it is painfully obvious that you are oblivious to other extenuating, newsworthy events within California. In addition, police officers lives gain meaning by doing a job that others (such as yourself), could not, would not do.

  • They bitch and complain about rumor and innuendo being bantered about, so WitLA goes out, gets the documents from the Civil Service Commission and reports on what was presented to the Commission in making their 5-0 decision to fire Mr Mandoyan. Now they are going NUTS.

    It seems like you can’t make the Kool-Aid drinkers happy.

  • ..who are “They”. Are police officers the only people who want fairness, equality, fair and balanced report, adherence to the legal concept of innocent until proven guilty, fact versus perception and “feelings”.

  • Alex,
    in your promise to “Reform, Rebuild, and Restore the LASD,” please explain how you are promoting transparency in “developing a new generation of leadership?”

    Seems instead, you are reliving a chapter out of the Tanaka play book. And it seems that chapter is being spoon fed to you by your chief of staff.

    In your ‘take off your bars and stars’ meeting, you touted line experience and education. Then you went on to promote numerous folks who have neither. You promoted several lieutenants 2-3 ranks in just months, leaving many who have worked around them baffled. It would seem, in your claim that Baca and Tanaka were the worst, you have similar traits.

    I guess as long as you surround yourself with yes men and woman, and the ELA deputies tell you you’re the best, all is good.

    “Power corrupts absolutely.”

  • Celeste, please, do not “move on.” The first few months of AV’s term reminds me of the 15 years of corruption hell after December 10th 1998 — a sheriff who really truly believed he was an unconventional big thinker, “thinking outside the box,” while others observing him were hoping they would wake up from a really bad dream. Lots of harebrained stuff. Lots of missteps. Lots of similarities between the current Sheriff and Dr. Baca and his little pal Tanaka. No doubt you and I are from pretty much opposite ends of the political spectrum, but I appreciate that you’re checking and reviewing and investigating and writing about all the questionable stuff that’s been going on since the election. Thank you, Celeste.

  • Editor’s Note:

    I didn’t think I needed to do this, but evidently I do.

    The commenter who wrote that Deputy Mandoyan’s attorneys “obtained a court order subpoena to serve WLA and the internet service provider for ‘IP addresses and identifying information.'” etc., is just trying to wind you up.

    Furthermore, if I ever did receive such a foolish subpoena, I would never turn over commenters’ IP addresses and/or other identifying information. (Unless, of course, a commenter made a criminal threat.)

    Instead, I would pack for Lynwood and, on my way out the door, I’d call three of the best reporter friends I know, and then I’d call my friends at the ACLU.

    In short, I would never give information on commenters or sources. I’d go to jail first. Any journalist worth the name would.

    C.

    PS: If you’re still worried, here’s a good, accurate rundown on the legal boundaries of defamation and slander, written by the people at the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

    Then, once you’ve read all of it, follow this rule of thumb: Avoid defaming or slandering people.

    https://www.eff.org/issues/bloggers/legal/liability/defamation

    • Most of what is said here are opinions. Freedom of speech, covered under the first amendment. As long as it’s not a threat to anyone, good luck with a judge allowing a subpoena. Celeste is also a repeated award winning journalist. KCBS reported today Mr.Mandoyan attorneys are doing what they should have done from day one of employment termination if he disagreed. He is suing the County of Los Angeles. Everything about all parties involed from top to bottom will be revealed.

      • …any many reporters received so called “prestigious awards” for their reporting and covering of the Trump Russia Colusion story. Those awards are worth about as much as a good role of scratch…no toilet paper.

        We’re not talking about awards for fiction? Or are we?

  • Thank you Celeste for your continued honest reporting. Off topic but does anyone else find it troubling how much pro Alex commenters on this site come off as threatening thugs?

  • Celeste, you may not comply with the subpoena (which I doubt) but the internet provider will.

    I doubt you’ll go to jail for anyone in this group. People here have been not only defaming the deputy but have also slandered, posted grossly false information and have publicly assasinated his character.

    His attorneys just filed a lawsuit in federal court for political retaliation which encompasses defamation and other causes for action. His attorneys have teamed up with another firm that specializes in the 1983 act and defamation.

    I’m sure the second lawsuit will be filed once the list is compiled. I’ve learned over time that reporters have zero moral compass or candor for anyone other than getting their story out for ratings.

    Say what you want, no one here should take your, “I’d go to jail first, then call three of my lawyer and my ACLU friends” at face value.

    This blog is done in my eyes and now I’m awaiting for the fallout from the discovery.

    You should have monitored your blog closely to prevent such behavior from happening. You in essence are a responsible party. As the blog administrator you have an obligation and are held accountable for monitoring the posts to prevent and omit slanderous and defamatory comments against others.

    Save the, I’m busy with other things, because no other article on your site generates more than 3 posts.

  • Not convincing enough Celeste. In another words you’d be held in contempt by the judge until you give the information up. The information isn’t only stored with you. There’s other avenues as well.

    So in other words, you’d ultimately be ordered to release the names. Good luck with your reporter and ACLU friends. Now it’s obvious why such skewed reporting was coming out of your blog.

    We’ll see how this will play out. Time for sitting back and grabbing my pop corn.

  • Power Corrupts and InterestedParty, you both read as butt hurt participants in a meeting where line experience and education finally mattered. Care to tally all the good things that have happened since AV took office? It’s easy to throw rocks and point out where he could have done better, but you fail to acknowledge the damage of decades of good ol’ boys cronyism. Very few people donated to AV’s campaign based on the 460’s, and only a handful of those got promoted. The vast majority of promotees didn’t even support AV’s campaign, so what’s your point?

    InterestedParty, please share the similarities of our current sheriff with the Baca/Tanaka disaster. That failed administration and the McDonnell/Teran reign of terror are thankfully over, and it’s a new day for everyone, even you.

    • Fed Up,

      Many of us remember AV being butt hurt when he got passed over and couldn’t get to units he thought he was deserving of.

      Keep taking big gulps of the kool-aid!

      • Translation: you had no answer to what I posed, figures. If all that AV achieves is to change the department so no one has to go through what he went through, then that leaves us all in a far better place than before. Unless, of course, you believe Baca and McDonnell were competent, ethical leaders who ran the department effectively, LOL.

  • Given that Mr. Mandoyan feels that he’s been treated unfairly, how ironic that he or anyone else would give the slightest thought to punishing people on or off LASD that have shared differing and often passionate opinions about public information here. Independent of that and the information Celeste has shared above, on a human level, this is a sad situation. First this man is terminated, then he is reinstated and then he is suddenly “un-reinstated” but still apparently reporting to work without salary or benefits. That has to be terribly difficult. While I hope he does great things as his term progresses, I think the Sheriff mishandled this deal and Mr. Mandoyan is now stuck in a lousy situation. I still wish he’d made some different off duty decisions but if he was wronged by a corrupt process may he get all he deserves.

    • @Take A breath,

      Wouldn’t it be ironic if the person wanting to punish people who share a differing opinion was Carl Mandoyan himself?
      What if the person who posted the fake news about Carl’s attorney obtaining a court subpoena for IP addresses/Identifying information was Carl himself?
      Could Carl be that manipulative? Not to bring culture into this, but it’s hard to imagine a person being that manipulative. [WLA edit]

      • 925 – I hadn’t thought about that (and frankly suspect that Mr. Mandoyan has better to do) but no matter who wrote those posts, the result is unfortunate. Whether I liked their choice of words or not, the comments of seemingly past/current LASD employees collectively provided some insight into the agency for those of us old people that worked elsewhere – and some are now notably silent. Other than on the LASD articles, there aren’t many comments here and some of their input was helpful. In fact, my view of this case has evolved as a result. A shame to lose the dialogue.

  • Be Honest, are you serious? Please tell me you jest. This is a free country, and anyone can file a lawsuit, as as Mr. Mandoyan has. It means nothing and you aren’t scarring anyone. Somehow you post as if you are in a patrol car talking to kids with sagging pants. They can issue all the subpoenas they want, any one with a lawsuit can. Will that change the fact that he was trying to break into his ex-girlfriend’s home. That in itself should be enough to get an officer fired, especially when he is engaging in activities for which he would arrest anyone else. Anyone in the LASD should be embarrassed with what is going on in the department.

    • Time to call BS on you CF. Any cop who arrests someone trying to enter his own home should be fired. A good street cop understands the difference between a 415F and a crime. Real victims don’t send I Love You texts to burglars.

  • “ the notoriously deputy-friendly Civil Service Commission upheld the LASD’s firing of Mandoyan“

    What Civil Servoce Commission are you referring to? LA County ? Why don’t you take a look at their history, it’s all online on their website.. fired Depuites have about a 20% chance of getting their termination overturned.. That sure doesn’t sound “Deputy Friendly” to me . Celeste, are you getting your info from S. Kuehl? Do some investigating on that.

    • The count is now up to six; Google “KTLA5: Villanueva reinstates at least six fired deputies.”

      Also, the L.A. Times has a story on the subject.

      Stay tuned; more to follow.

  • Cognistator, has it ever occurred to you that every sheriff has brought back terminated deputies after settlement agreements? Of those cases you refer to, three of them were brought back by civil service. Oops. So what is your point? Please explain to everyone that you believe everything McDonnell and Teran did was above the board and based on evidence that wasn’t concealed. I look forward to your defense of the indefensible.

    • Nope, that never occurred to me, probably because in the past there has never been such a large number of terminated Deputies seeking reinstatement, by hook or crook.

      Previous news reports, already cited in this forum, are that there are something like four hundred cases in the “Truth and Reconciliation Commission” pipeline, and these are just the beginning.

      Since they’re receiving intense media scrutiny lessee what happens.

      The Truth will out.

  • In thinking & reading about Sheriff Villanueva’s program of reconciliation, it reminds me of the Jussie Smollett Chicago case, that of a debate over the decision to prosecute or not. In the Mandoyan matter, Mandoyan is equivalent to Smollett & Sheriff Villanueva to Kim Foxx. The Board Of Supervisors & Civil Service Commission’s reaction relates principally to authority coupled with questioned prosecutorial (discipline) descretion. As the Sheriff reinstates or absolves heretofore disciplined deputies, the debate over descretion & authority will continue to gain tempature. In the Mandoyan matter, much like Kim Foxx, Sheriff Villanueva has given Mandoyan license to claim innocence & victimization. And like Smollett, Mandoyan’s public claims are met with understandable skepticism. Perhaps Mandoyan is as innocent as Smollett & Sheriff Villanueva as forward thinking as Kim Foxx. As in the strong call for the continued lessening or modification of criminal sanction, Sheriff Villanueva seems aligned in applying the sample principle to discipline. Also consistent with the efforts to expunge criminal histories based in the notion that they are too burdensome, how about doing the same for deputies because a disciplinary record creates liability, impedes organizational mobility & promotion. Given a time related forgiveness scale, I envision an LASD without any discoverable material. I’d emplore the defense bar, civil rights groups & employee unions to join in this “progressive” notion. The game “truth isn’t truth” is in full play here & the Sheriff is self described as a Democrat Progressive, so let’s move the bar along with the State trend.

  • @The Past

    You must have a lot of time on your hands, because none of the shit you wrote in your novel makes any sense. Try getting a hobby, other than trying to impress everyone that you’re an eloquent writer.

    • “The Past” made his narrative very plain and simple to comprehend.

      Don’t compare him to the character named “Charlie Unit” who wants to impress with his greek literature & folklore

  • I like the new Sheriff so far, but he does need to slow down on the-hiring terminated deputies…especially given all the media attention.

  • Let’s be honest. No one thought of Carl as a hard working or well respected. Talked a good game, bought a bunch of drinks and food. As a reserve deputy he was the station mascot. Never had much of a career. If he keeps his job maybe he can turn a key. At least he could handle that paperwork.

  • If I recall back around 2008-2009 there was a memo (I don’t recall what department, Feds, US Attorney) that was sent to all agencies. This memo mentioned that if you have any employees that have or had domestic violence in the past or present, convicted or not that you could not carry a duty weapon. My partner had 30 years on the department and was made aware of his situation from an allegation 25 years prior. He was told to demote or retire per this memo. He retired but I saw other former officers become custody assistants. So I am wondering if this situation would prevent this deputy from getting his job back

    • No such memo was ever written. The list distributed by Cal DOJ showed criminal convictions. If your friend was impacted, he had been convicted of a DV-related crime. This is the result of the Lautenberg Amendment to the Gun Control Act of 1968.

      As to your rhetorical question: Mandoyan was never charged, tried, or convicted of any DV-related crime, so any conviction-related disability could not apply.

      • I’m bored, so here’s a little more information about Lautenberg:

        ATF (federal guidelines) allow a person convicted of DV to have their firearm rights restored pursuant to an expungement.

        https://www.atf.gov/file/58786/download

        California, however, has found a way to permanently screw people with DV-related convictions. The expungement statute 1203.4 PC says:

        “…(2) Dismissal of an accusation or information pursuant to this section does not permit a person to own, possess, or have in his or her custody or control any firearm or prevent his or her conviction under Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 29800) of Division 9 of Title 4 of Part 6.”

        In short, in spite of the federal exception, California permanently takes away firearm rights.

  • Editor’s Note:

    I’ve just spiked nine comments in the last 24 hours written by a cluster of commenters who appear to think it’s amusing to straight up trash people personally and viciously, or who are playing adolescent word games to poorly disguise their trashing of people personally and viciously.

    Knock it off or risk being blocked. Permanently.

    Fair warning.

    C.

    • Why did you “spike” my comments? I don’t trash talk and wouldn’t comment on anything unless I can back it up. I’m a man and far from an adolescent and certainly don’t have the time or patience for games. And you thought it was vicious? Did somebody see some truth posted and nutted up to the point of crying to you that they are hurt by truthful comments or perhaps fear who may read what was posted? The comments were relative to the topic and merit less D.V accusations and those who take a role to cover it up. And the very fact you took My comments off proves my point of covering up the truth. How do think those accused of bullshit cases that were left hung to dry feel about it? Do you think those faceless cowards who ruined careers and broke apart families acted viscously as they played with lives and the well being of families? I’ll own what I said today, tomorrow and hereinafter.

  • Editor’s Note:

    Dear “Leibrich,”

    Actually you weren’t one of those I was referring to regarding the adolescent word games. You were quite straightforward in your personal attacks. I don’t know anything about the people you were attacking. I don’t care.

    If you see other attacks that I haven’t caught, please flag them for me.

    Thank you in advance for your cooperation.

    C.

    • Once again they weren’t personal attacks. They are facts. Your’e the moderator so respectfully handle your own flagging. The only ones personally attacking are the ousted folks from the last regime and a few crumbs left on the table. That’s the only reason you get any attention on this site. They called it accidentally leaking info to the press to justify their existence in the public eye. Self interest is the name of their game..

  • @ Leibrich, crickets speaking; question is, who is our fearless leader Villanueva? Question I have is, who is Alex other than the elected Sheriff? If the deputies follow him, where is he taking them? My view is that he is in over his head & certainly doesn’t know what he doesn’t know. His actions are putting the Contract Cities program in jeopardy, a program that is perhaps the most cost efficient municipal effort in existence. Our LA Contract cities need to deliver our self described “progressive’” a clear message, “you’re the elected Sheriff but you exist because we choose to buy your product”. I’d challenge Sheriff Villanueva to host a Contract Cities forum with the City Managers to explain his view of the cost model, Gonzales included, & how he is stabilizing the costs. If litigation costs are problematic, why is he rehiring of past problem staff? Is the abandonment of the long standing understanding of the internal department “ disciplinary bail schedule” a move that will likely increase contract liability? Is Villanueva forward thinking or primarily focused on personal perceptions of past grievances? He is similar to former U/S Paul Tanaka in his “F the FBI” vs “F” the Board of Supervisors? I have talked to very few who are not concerned with the Sheriff. So Liebrich, what’s your thinking?

    • I’d challenge you to explain how you think AV hasn’t already met with the liability trust fund group and the contract city association, probably on multiple occasions. McDonnell is the one who put the contract city model in jeopardy by the sheer incompetence of his administration. City after city was alarmed by the increasing number of vacant positions and forced overtime throughout the county. Reducing vacancies and allowing cities to pick their own chiefs of police has actually increased contract city satisfaction with the LASD – just ask any city manager not employed by La Puente.

      The impending massive litigation, both at civil service and in Superior Court, from the hundreds of wrongful termination cases is what should be of concern to each contract city. They are on the hook to pay for all of McDonnell’s incompetence.

  • I respect your thinking. You are obviously not a Sheriff Villanueva supporter. People don’t like change because it disrupts the inner circle they worked so hard to mold. The Board of Supervisors are not running their household, where perhaps the only response they get is a “yes”

    I just find it comical how they chose to question the Sheriffs decisions and nobody ever bothered to question why Mcbuckles promoted Captains to Commanders with very questionable disciplinary on duty behavior. But I would say it was because it would keep them from exposing his shenanigans. https://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-sheriff-promotions-discipline-20170430-story.html

    • Heard a guy who was been off IOD for the last year and doesn’t have a degree just get promoted to Captain. That doesn’t seem to meet the standards AV has put out in the press.

  • “McDonnell said in a separate statement that all his “promotions have been completely vetted. A tremendous amount of thought went into each selection. I stand behind every single one of them.” I don’t recall the B.O.S following up on this decision!!!!

    Stop the madness !!

  • Leibrich, I would suggest that there have always been people who have questioned internal LASD promotions. You may recall there was a LOT of complaining about who McDonnell had promoted during his tenure. Or maybe your forgot. Sheriff Villanueva virtually invited a spotlight on his promotions after he cleaned house and promoted a bunch of people well beyond their experience level. Note I say “experience level”. I am not saying they are not capable. What I am saying is that they truly lack experience to fill the rolls they have been asked to fulfill. Perhaps these people are fast learners, but it is only natural that so many, all at once, would raise eyebrows well beyond those that have been raised before.

    The Sheriff then doubled-down with his ill-timed rehire of Carl Mandoyan, following it up by going down to the BOS and turning the whole episode in to a circus. The spotlight he was under went to a sunspot and now, virtually everything he does is under a microscope.

    “Out of the Frying Pan in to the Fire” would be a good name for this movie.

    • I can’t say I disagree with you at all 25 cents more. Both sides need to pick and choose their battles. And I by no means side with any hypocrite. So we’ll see how it plays out. I speak from experience and not by hearsay regarding my comments. There are some who have stated they would run through a wall for supervisor.. I can give two shits about any person, supervisor and down the line who forgot where he/she came from and colludes with others to clean up their self inflicted problems.. we’re human and all make mistakes.. The respect comes from owning it. Many trying to be big dogs when they have puppy nuts!!

  • We also know of a current city manager of LaPuente who isn’t happy with Villanueva and wanted a promise from Sheriff V to be the number two guy in the department. It’s obvious old God, Country and Guns Lindsey is still wondering why no one in the Sheriff’s Department cares about his opinion. Could it be that Bob is trying to speak on behalf of contract cities as if he’s in charge of them all, which is a common “know-it-all and I’m smarter than everyone” trait of his. Move along Bobby and take your PPOA friends with you.

  • ” Theres one thing I’ve noticed about these videos coming out against this Deputy. They labeled him and made him sound like an aggressive violent man, yet everytime in these videos of him, hes very calm and not raising his voice. Usually, someone that is aggressive or violent would be yelling. This deputy is not.”

    So if a psycho is “calm” while stalking your daughter you are ok with it?

    • When your daughter lets psycho move in, locks him out repeatedly, and then texts him “I love you” after letting him back in, I’d say the problem is your psycho daughter.

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